Negative emissions and net zero: how do technologies for carbon dioxide removal measure up?

CO2 removal
Tuesday, September 28, 2021 - 15:00
Online webinar

Start time 15:00 CEST (14:00 BST). The European Union is committed to keeping the average temperature rise to well below 2°C, preferably closer to 1.5°C, which according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) requires bringing global GHG emissions to net zero by 2050. The IPCC scenarios show that alongside implementing other climate mitigation policies it is essential to remove CO2 from the atmosphere, known as carbon dioxide removal (CDR) which includes negative emission technologies (NETs). Various options are being reviewed and discussed, including both nature-based solutions and CCS-based solutions. The most common CCS-related solutions identified are direct air carbon capture and storage (DACCS) and CCS on energy production from biomass (BECCS).  
 
This event discussed policy mechanisms for the delivery of CDR, storage longevity and the role of offsetting, and presented some real project examples and the potential range of biogenic sources that combined with CCS can enable CDR.

 

VIEW THE RECORDING     |    VIEW THE PRESENTATION SLIDES

 

Chair: Marie Bysveen, SINTEF

Agenda

  • 15:00 Intro and Housekeeping – Chair
  • 15:05 Restoring Sustainable Carbon Cycles – Timo Herberz, DG Climate Action, European Commission
  • 15:20 Net Zero accounting for carbon dioxide removal – Mark Preston Aragon, Bellona Europe 
  • 15:35 BECCS on waste-to-energy plants: An entry path into at-scale CDR – Marian Krüger, Sustainability in Business Lab, ETH Zurich
  • 15:50 From Carbon neutral to Carbon negative products in the pulp and paper industry – Dr. Heinz Felder, Stora Enso
  • 16:05 The Roll out of DAC in the UK through the Acorn Project - Alan James, CTO, Storegga
  • 16:20 Opportunities for NETs from existing biogenic sources: a Scottish study – Philippa Parmiter, SCCS
  • 16:30 Panel discussion (speakers) and Q&A 

 

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay